Board of Directors

President

Holly Corlew

Vice President

Jeremy Spencer

Secretary

Chad Fussell

Treasurer

Ann Heath

 

Joan Goodmiller

Doris Grigsby

Wayne Hall

Harriet J. Jordan

Joan Rial

Kyle Sanders

Steve Scherer

Ellen Williams

Naomi Wothke

Our Services

Day Services

Supported Employment: Staff assist individuals in securing jobs that match their unique skills and aptitude, job coaching, and ongoing support as needed.

Community Based Day: Staff provide opportunities for individuals to explore the community by being involved in chosen activities that may result in meaningful relationships or paid employment.

Personal Assistance

Staff provide individual assistance with a variety of activities in the home and community for adults and children

Nursing Services

Nursing Services: Licensed nurses provide physician ordered services in the individual’s home or in the community.

Medical Residential: Nursing services are provided in addition to 24 hour per day staffing in specialized, accessible homes.

Residential Services

Supported Living: Staff supports one to three people living in their own home in the community.

Residential Habilitation: Staff supports people living in homes owned by the Agency.

Medical Residential: Nursing services are provided in addition to 24 hour per day staffing in specialized, accessible homes.

Family Based Residential Services: One or two individuals live with and receive support from a family in the family’s home.

Family Support Services

Family Support: Families with a member with a severe disability are supported according to the needs identified by the family. Services may include, but are not limited to, financial assistance, supplies, equipment, respite, and service coordination.

Employment and Community First

Essential Family Supports, which targets people of all ages who live at home with their families

Essential Supports for Employment and Independent Living, which targets people who are 21 or older who are living or want to live independently and pursue employment and community living goals

Comprehensive Supports for Employment and Community Living, which targets people who are 21 or older who need a more comprehensive level of support to meet their employment and community living goals.

Early Intervention Services

Foundations Early Intervention: Services are provided in the home and community for infants and toddlers under age three who exhibit a delay or disability in speech, motor, cognitive, social or other skills, and for their families.

Mid-Cumberland Child Care Resource and Referral

Mid-Cumberland Child Care Resource and Referral: Provides resources to parents, child care professionals, and others who support quality childcare and development.

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Respite Services

Respite Services: Short term residential support is provided in the individual’s home or in agency owned homes.

The-Arc-White

The Arc

The Arc: Promotes and protects the human rights of people with intellectual and developmental disabilities and actively supports their full inclusion and participation in the community throughout their lifetimes.

Mission Statement and Beliefs

Mission Statement

“Building an Inclusive Community”

Main Office

BELIEFS

  • People with disabilities have the same rights as all other people but may need support to exercise those rights.
  • People with disabilities, regardless of the severity, belong in the community and should be supported there.
  • Supports should enable people with disabilities to become active, participating members of their community.
  • Supports should encourage and enhance the development of relationships between people with disabilities and other people.
  • Supports should encourage and enhance sources of natural support, including the family.
  • Supports should enable people with disabilities to make choices and assume control of their personal affairs.
  • Supports should assist people with disabilities achieve a positive and personally desirable future.
  • Supports should enhance the dignity and respect of the individual.

Executive Directors

Donald Redden

Executive Director

Katie Powers

Associate Executive Director

Trend Setters Residential

Travis Saine

Director

Adam Lechner

Assistant Director/ Program Manager

Brenda Lory

Program Manager

Barbara Brandon

Program Manager

Mike Price

Program Manager/ Mental Health Specialist

Carla Quijada

Program Manager

Medical

Donna Tidwell

Director Of Nursing

Tammy Estes

Health Assistant

Alaina Glasgow

Health Assistant

Dee Annis

Health Assistant

Kimberly Lane

Health Assistant

Pathways Day Program

Richard Streck

Director

Amy White

Program Manager

ECF Choices

Cindy McLean

Director

Employment

Jacson Chapman

Employment Specialist

Trista Garton

Job Developer

Kay Story

Pre-ETS Coordinator

Financial

Terri Dickey

Business Manager

Amber Donegan

Payroll / Benefit Coordinator

Cindy Stone

AP/AR/Personal Funds Coordinator

John Petty

Accountant

Bill Cavallino

Billing Manager

Coordinators

Melissa Wilson

Weekend Staffing Coordinator

Cheryl Waters

Human Resources

Laura Sellers

Quality Improvement Coordinator

Peter Bogdan

Training Coordinator

Mike Salewsky

Facilities Coordinator

Jim Orsbon

Quality Assurance Coordinator

Robyn Lampley

The Arc Services Coordinator

Assistants

Kelly Mollenhour

Office Assistant

Miriam Cooksey

Administrative Assistant

A BRIEF HISTORY OF DEVELOPMENTAL SERVICES

The Dickson County Adult Activity was initiated by a group of parents and other interested citizens in 1974.  Services began for 18 adults with intellectual disabilities in the old Jackson Clinic building, then a part of the United Methodist Church of Dickson.  In 1975 the agency assumed management of a group home in White Bluff housing 17 adults.  In 1976 the program, then serving 35 adults, was moved to the old Sylvia schoolhouse.

  In 1979 the agency opened a group home for six women in Dickson.  Later that year, the program moved to a newly renovated facility on East College Street in Dickson.  In 1980 a group home for ten individuals opened on Poplar Street, closing the larger group home in White Bluff.

  In 1981 the agency began operating early intervention services, initially serving seven children in a program the families named Foundations.  Also in 1981 the agency changed its name to Developmental Services of Dickson County.

  In 1982 the agency assumed management of the former Goodwill program.  It was called DS Industries and Budget Store and was located on Mulberry Street in Dickson.  Later in 1982, the first newly constructed group home, the W.V. Lightfoot home, was opened on West Fifth Street in Dickson.  This home replaced the home on Main Street and was home for eight women.

  In 1984 the agency moved its day services and administrative offices to a facility on North Main Street in Dickson.  Later the DSI Budget Store was moved to the same location.

  In 1985 the Foundations Preschool Program expanded and hired its first full-time teacher.  Eighteen children and families were served.   A collaborative program with six other programs to employ a pediatric physical therapist to serve young children was also started in 1985. Subsequently Foundations expanded into Cheatham and Robertson counties and today serves over 85 children and families.

  Also in 1985, the newly constructed Buckner Group Home was opened on Highway 48 North.  Serving ten adults, it brought the number of persons served in residential programs to twenty-one.  In 1985 fifty adults were served in day services.

In 1986 the agency initiated services in Houston County for adults.  A new position to develop community-based jobs for persons with disabilities was created and the first consumer gained full-time employment in the community.  1986 featured the first Balloon Flyaway, an agency fund raising event held in conjunction with Old Timer’s Day in Dickson.

In 1987 the agency began offering Medicaid funded services for persons previously institutionalized or at risk of institutionalization.  A home for eight elderly women, the Michael Group Home, was opened on Sylvis Street, the Cauthen Group Home for four women was opened on Center Avenue, and the Burns Group Home was opened for four men.  The DSI Budget store was closed to create more space for the new adults entering the program.

In 1987 the agency received its first grant for developing community jobs from the state Division of Rehabilitation Services.  In 1988 the agency also opened its first work crew site at Maxwell Graphics, later Quebecor.  Services continued to expand in community jobs and community participation until in 1999 the agency closed its sheltered workshop and transitioned everyone into community-based day activities.

  In 1991 the first supported living services opened, providing in home services to two women in their own home.  Other sites followed in 1992 and most every year afterward.  As people moved into supported living and more community-scale homes, the group homes began to downsize or close.

  In 1993 the agency began providing Family Support services to families containing a member with significant disabilities.  These services were initially offered in Dickson, Houston, and Humphreys counties.  In 1994 services were expanded to Cheatham County.  In July 2012 services will begin in Montgomery and Stewart counties.

  In 2001 the agency initiated the Mid-Cumberland Child Care Resource Center to provide training and technical assistance to child care providers in Dickson, Houston, Cheatham, Robertson, Montgomery, Stewart, Williamson, Rutherford, Wilson, Trousdale, Humphreys, and Sumner counties. Later renamed as the Mid-Cumberland Child Care Resource and Referral, the program expanded in 2003 with several programs to assist military families in the state and region. In July 2012 the program will also provide services in Davidson County.

  Today, Developmental Services supports over three hundred adults and children in a variety of home and community-based services.  Developmental Services employs over two hundred and eighty staff members in eight counties and expends an annual operating budget in excess of $9.0 million.

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